Easily Integrate These Wall Street Journal Articles in Your Class
advertisement


Welcome to the Spring Term!

Make sure your students take advantage of our limited-time offer: only $1 per week for 15 weeks!

They can subscribe at WSJ.com/studentoffer.
THIS WEEK'S ARTICLES
The Tech Caravan Rolls Into Miami
Apple Woos App Developers
3-D Printing's Promise-and Limits
Music Rivals Say Apple Move Won't Scare Them
U.S. Rubber-Band Maker Survives by Stretching Its Portfolio of Products

The Tech Caravan Rolls Into Miami
by: Arian Campo-Flores
May 31, 2014
Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com

TOPICS: Entrepreneurship

SUMMARY: Miami is becoming a tech hub. The emergence of Miami's startup scene is driven in part by U.S. companies seeking to tap Latin America's expanding technology market and a growing crop of Latin American entrepreneurs hoping to gain a foothold here. Already, Miami can point to several successes. One is Open English, an online English-language school launching in Venezuela in 2008 and how based in Miami, with 2,000 employees spread across the region. Not all companies are tied to Latin America-some are strictly Miami and Florida born. VC-investments in Miami area companies jumped to $369 million in 2013 compared to $102 million in 2010. Miami still faces numerous challenges, like any emerging entrepreneurial hot-spot. Miami's biggest advantage is that it's the clear hub for Latin America.

CLASSROOM APPLICATION: This article provides a clear and sensible explanation for why Miami is becoming a tech hub. Discuss with your students the excitement this development is undoubtedly creating in Miami. Also, ask your students to talk about the pace of entrepreneurial activity in the city that your college or university is located, or a nearby city that may be larger. Discuss what it would take to convert that city into a tech hub.

QUESTIONS: 
1. (Introductory) Make a bullet-point list of reasons that Miami has become a tech hub. What can other startup-communities learn from Miami's experiences?

2. (Advanced) Identify a city that has some of the same characteristics as Miami, which might position it to become a tech hub in the future.

3. (Advanced) To what degree is the city where your college or university is located a tech hub? What steps could be taken to improve the tech-related entrepreneurial activity in your town or city?

Reviewed By: Bruce Barringer, Oklahoma State University


Apple Woos App Developers
by: Daisuke Wakabayashi
Jun 03, 2014
Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com

TOPICS: Apple Inc., New Product Development

SUMMARY: Apple will not be coming out with new gadgets-at least anytime soon. At the Apple Developers' Conference in San Francisco this week, Apple's announcements were largely technical-new ways for apps to talk to one another and a new program language to help developers create apps more easily. It also unveiled plans to make the iPhone a hub for other home and fitness apps. Apple's last breakthrough new product was the iPad, which made its debut in 2010. It's been reported that Apple is working on a smartwatch, a revamped set-top box and an iPhone with a larger screen. It's not clear when these devices will be ready. In iOS Apple plans to introduce a new app called Health. Health will collect all of a user's fitness and health data in one spot. It also unveiled HealthKit, which will allow health and fitness apps to talk to each other more easily.

CLASSROOM APPLICATION: Talk to your students about Apple. Speculate on why it is taking Apple so long to come out with a new hardware product, like a smartwatch or an iPhone with a larger screen. Talk about the potential of Health, the fitness/wellness app Apple will be introducing.

QUESTIONS: 
1. (Introductory) Speculate on how Apple keep secrets so well? With all the investigative reporters snooping around, no one seems to know how far along Apple is on its new products? How can this be so?

2. (Advanced) Why do you think its taking Apple so long to come out with a new hardware product?

3. (Advanced) How big of a hit do you think Health will be, the fitness/wellness app Apple will be introducing?

Reviewed By: Bruce Barringer, Oklahoma State University


3-D Printing's Promise-and Limits
by: Peter S. Green
Jun 02, 2014
Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com

TOPICS: Innovations

SUMMARY: What about the promise of 3-D printing? Here's the latest. The technology works very well in some settings-but it doesn't scale very well. Manufacturers say that 3-D printing beats traditional methods for jobs involving complex designs or limited production runs. But it doesn't work as well for cranking out more than a few thousand items in a short period of time. In that instance, traditional manufacturing techniques work better. The biggest limitation of 3-D printing is that it isn't fast. For example Rest Devices, a company cited in the article, can make an unit of a product it sells every 15 to 20 seconds using traditional injection molding, where it takes a 3-D printer 15 to 20 minutes to make the same product. 3-D printer manufacturers acknowledge the difference, and say that 3-D printers are equip to help designers and engineers test ideas and speed the development of products, not necessarily replace large-scale manufacturing.

CLASSROOM APPLICATION: This article brings students up to speed on the appropriate application of 3-D printing. Review the article with your students, and talk about the proper use cases for 3-D printers.

QUESTIONS: 
1. (Introductory) Briefly explain how a 3-D printer works?

2. (Advanced) In what situations are 3-D printers most useful for entrepreneurs?

3. (Advanced) Many people have projected that 3-D printing will become a disruptive technology, and will change that basic way that products are both designed and manufactured. To what degree does this article support or refute that theory?

Reviewed By: Bruce Barringer, Oklahoma State University


Music Rivals Say Apple Move Won't Scare Them
by: Sven Grundberg
Jun 02, 2014
Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com

TOPICS: Business Models, Competitive Strategy

SUMMARY: Apple's acquisition of Beats Electronics may provide a foundation for enabling Apple to launch a music-streaming service, but Apple's competitors aren't shaking in their boots yet. Online music-streaming services like Spotify, a rising star in the industry, have indicated no change in their plans. In fact, Spotify remains committed to investing in growth instead of pursuing immediate profits. This commitment comes amid a chorus of concerns about the business models of many stand-alone streaming-music providers. Spotify, for instance, is growing but has never made money. As its user base expands, so does the amount of money it has to pay to rights holders who own the music on its service. Beats's tie-in with Apple gives it a lot of cash, opposed to money-losing competitors. Now we'll see how Apple and Beats pursue streaming music, an industry that also includes Pandora.

CLASSROOM APPLICATION: Ask your students to speculate on how Apple and Beats will take on competitors in the streaming-music space. Also, talk about Spotify's business model. Ask your students if they think Spotify's business model is viable long term.

QUESTIONS: 
1. (Introductory) How do you think Apple/Beats will approach the streaming-music marketplace?

2. (Advanced) Are you a believer or a non-believer in Spotify's business model? Explain your answer.

3. (Advanced) Five years from now do you think Apple and Beats will be a small, mid-sized or large player in the streaming-music space? Explain your answer.

Reviewed By: Bruce Barringer, Oklahoma State University


U.S. Rubber-Band Maker Survives by Stretching Its Portfolio of Products
by: James R. Hagerty
Jun 02, 2014
Click here to view the full article on WSJ.com

TOPICS: Corporate Strategy, Innovations

SUMMARY: The rubber band market has been turned upside down in recent years. Not only have overseas companies, which benefit from lower labor costs, grabbed much of the U.S. market, but some of the biggest traditional uses for rubber bands, such as holding together newspapers and bundles of mail, are dwindling away. In response, one of the few remaining U.S. makers, Alliance Rubber, has survived by finding new uses for loops of rubber. In fact, the company is reporting record sales. Today, the bulk of Alliance's products are spinoffs from the original rubber-band concept, including bands used for stretching exercises, holding together bunches of produce or flowers, or organizing electric cables. Alliance also sells wristbands, some of which are infused with fragrances that it says relieve stress. Employees can earn a $1,000 bonus by suggestion an idea that turns into a product for Alliance.

CLASSROOM APPLICATION: This is a fascinating article. It speaks to how one company, Alliance Rubber, has overcome tremendous changes in its industry, and rather than giving up it has recalibrated and found new uses for its staple product-rubber bands. Ask your students to brainstorm additional uses for rubber bands. Also, look at Alliance Rubber's Web site and further critique the company.

QUESTIONS: 
1. (Introductory) On a scale of 1-10 (10 is high), how impressed are you with the changes that Alliance Rubber has made to remain competitive? Explain your answer.

2. (Advanced) Brainstorm at least one additional use for rubber bands, or the basic material that makes up rubber bands, that you don't see Alliance Rubber currently selling.

3. (Advanced) What is your opinion of Alliance Rubber's suggestion program? If you were an employee of Alliance Rubber, would the chance to get a $1,000 bonus motivate you to think hard about additional uses for the company's basic product?

Reviewed By: Bruce Barringer, Oklahoma State University


To change your email preferences, go to http://ProfessorJournal.com
Journal-in-Education Program
200 Burnett Road, Chicopee, MA 01020
Copyright 2014 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved